Considering that high blood pressure medication is prescribed to treat a restriction of blood flow to the brain due to plaque or cholesterol build-up in the arteries, it would stand to reason that the essential concern should be reduction of the plaque or cholesterol, and that blood pressure medications should be an emergency rather than a long-term treatment. In many instances, however, if a patient does not know to ask for a cholesterol lowering drug or supplement, they’d never learn, as doctors do not typically volunteer the information, though they ALWAYS should…

Requirement of dissemination of information regarding statins and/or other cholesterol lowering agents should be entailed in the American Medical Association’s Opinion 2.20 standards, etc., that make it unlawful to withhold life sustaining medical treatment, though an individual may be far from the end of their lives. Taking blood pressure medications may prolong life; the side effects, as are particularly synonymous with extensive periods of usage, however, have proven counterproductive in terms of leading to development of other serious life-threatening complications.

A patient’s cholesterol should be brought within a reasonable range after three months of use of a statin. If not, the statin may be combined with other cholesterol lowering medications to accomplish this.

I worked with a lady a while back who informed me that after about three months of taking a statin (Crestor, if I recall adequately) both her high blood pressure and diabetes disappeared. Amusingly, for some people, statins pose risk of development of diabetes, however dichotomous that may sound. Thus, each individual with high blood pressure and/or diabetes should be assessed to determine which cholesterol lowering medication, etc. they should take. EVERY person who has high blood pressure/hypertension and/or diabetes SHOULD in fact take a statin and/or other appropriate form of a cholesterol lowering agent…

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