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Medical lab reports for yearly health examinations and for emergency and other visits are typically available to us, free of cost, within at most a few days after collection of blood and urinary samples, and they should be as a matter of medical and data integrity. Medical lab reports for yearly health examinations and for emergency and other visits should also be available for children, free of cost, for the same reasons. Yearly health reports and other individual reports that are produced during emergency and other visits, are distinguishable from comprehensive health files for which there is typically a cost…

If an individual has never been distributed their lab reports for yearly health examinations and for emergency and other visits, they should be capable of retrieving a copy of each report free of cost; this would also be distinguishable from request and receipt of a comprehensive medical file.

Medical lab reports should be offered/given to examinees by hospitals and clinics, as most people probably don’t request them. When I started requesting my own lab reports, I discovered some things that my doctors had never told me that were adversely affecting my health, like the fact that my cholesterol was significantly high. I discovered in a subsequent report that a doctor had falsely diagnosed me with type 2 diabetes and prescribed me a dangerous diabetes medication, Metformin, which is known to cause diabetic ketoacidosis…

My fasting glucose was 112 (which falls within the range of pre-diabetic*and is reversible without medication), while a glucose level of 126 or higher is considered type 2 diabetes. *I did learn while conducting independent research on Metformin that it is infrequently prescribed to prevent type 2 diabetes, though I would hope that in each of those cases the patients are being told that they are pre-diabetic [not diabetic], if this is so, and given a choice of if they’d be interested in taking Metformin, considering its pros and cons. The same doctor who prescribed me the Metformin simultaneously prescribed me Lipitor, which is known to cause type 2 diabetes, to satisfy my statin request, and in deviation from the Simvastatin* that I had been taking, which is typically safer than Lipitor and other statins, which work to reduce cholesterol.

*The effects of any statin varies from person to person. Prior to my discontinuance of Simvastatin after seeing that it apparently raised my triglycerides, my use resulted in a drop in my total cholesterol from 246 to 229 (17 points)… My LDL cholesterol dropped from 181 to 140 (41 points). My HDL “good cholesterol” also dropped from 46 to 42 (4 points), however… My Non-HDL cholesterol dropped from 200 to 187. Alarmingly, my triglycerides rose from 96 to 237 (141 points), which does not seem logical, considering that at this point I’d made lifestyle improvements juxtapose taking the statin. Perhaps the outlandish triglyceride reading was an error. In any event, it made me re-think statins and research even healthier cholesterol lowing agents, and there are numerous, including Naicin (which has proven really effective), garlic and/or garlic oil supplements, and omega-3 fatty acids, to name a few…

Considering my own misdiagnosis and discovering that my cholesterol was high after requesting my lab reports (and never being informed of this by my then doctor or given treatment for it until I requested it), I was, understandably, very concerned when the Memphis Children’s Clinic informed me that lab reports for children from yearly health examinations were not routinely provided to parents, though I could order them for a cost of $25.00… for my son and $28.50… for my daughter (which is a bit steep for indigent parents, particularly when they have more than one child), and I had never received any lab reports for my children, only printed summaries of vitals for each year’s health examination. They typically do not disburse anything in writing during other non-routine visits. Even more alarming, I could not walk into the local Memphis Children’s Clinic and make the payment to receive the records. I would either have to pay for the records over the phone by providing my bank card number or by driving to Southaven, Mississippi to pay, which I found very unusual and even absurd. There is no method of paying online or by any other means where I could simultaneously receive a receipt or confirmation of payment while waiting for the reports to be mailed…

This was not only suspicious, it made me wonder if something was being hidden from me regarding the health of my children, particularly my now-seven-year-old daughter, who I’ve been taking back and forth to the hospital for recurring abdominal pain for the last few years. I have wondered, more specifically, if these medical facilities have purposely not treated my daughter, which, if true, is not only cruel and barbaric, it warrants prosecution, and investigation into whether or not this is happening with other especially indigent minority children, and/or the children of others who are in a protected status, i.e. for reporting discrimination and/or other improprieties at major or influential companies for which they are or have been employed. Or, perhaps, it is occult activity (sacrificial and/or sexual abuse) by powerful religious groups with political prowess and apprehensions regarding messianic figures or “deliverers” of oppressed persons (minorities) and/or it is a political strategy for controlling the population and government spending, all of which are unethical and unlawful…

Medical transparency should be a norm in both adult and pediatric healthcare. Every patient or examinee should receive something either in writing and/or electronically for every doctor’s or hospital visit, and those lab reports should be without cost for adults and children. Both my cholesterol and my blood pressure, when tested without the presence of blood pressure medication, have been significantly reduced, thanks to my independent research, based upon my own perusal of lab results of my yearly health examinations.

I’ll continue to monitor my progress while taking my blood pressure medication and cholesterol-lowering agents. I’ll also continue retrieving my children’s lab results each year, regardless of any created obstacles, and I encourage all parents to do the same.

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