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Online course recovery should be perpetually available in all schools—elementary, middle, high school, and even college—to all students who have been retained or failed courses. Some schools, like Millington-Central High, which is one of the schools where I worked as a substitute paraprofessional, are already using online course recovery, though it is apparently not available after school or during summer periods, and some content on the site should be reviewed and re-written to improve clarity.

Georgia State University and likely other colleges have what’s called repeat-to-replace, which could be a foundation for collegiate course recovery, which should not require necessarily repeating an entire class, however, unless a student failed all elements of the course…

It should neither require technically re-enrolling in the course, but picking up where one left off and/or completing and submitting previously un-mastered or incomplete course material.

Course recovery that is similar to Millington Central’s program, which includes instructors’ pre-recorded video lectures, juxtaposed typed content and quizzes, should be online and free of cost in every academic setting; it could also be utilized in conjunction with incomplete grade designation.

Making online course recovery available after school and during summer periods would privilege students to re-take and master courses or specific course material, circumvent failure, and be promoted to their proper grades (as for those who have been retained), and without necessity to attend summer school…

Schools should provide the link to their course recovery portals on their websites and require relevant students to make use of it. They should also attach information about the site to students’ progress reports and report cards and/or general online student accounts.

Course recovery would ultimately save schools, parents, collegiate students, and the government billions of dollars by circumventing grade retention and relevant costs in terms of paying for students to re-take classes that they’ve already taken and failed, particularly where students who are behind by more than a year are concerned…

It would also encourage graduation, the pursuit and successful acquiring of higher education and careers that would support quality living amongst students who’d ordinarily be predisposed to dropping out.

It would additionally reduce crime and improve public morale by pre-occupying at-risk students, who should be provided computers and/or other technology by varied sources for the purpose of participating in course recovery, SAT prep, and general course work…

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