I purchased a “Call of Duty Black Ops” game for my son that he’d wanted, after a Game Stop worker told me that it was a military game with appropriate content for teens. This was not the same gentleman at another store location that moved who actually understood my definition of appropriate… I was surprised with the level of violence and bloodshed in the game and how realistic it all appeared, and expressed to my son that I did not like what I was seeing. The content is not appropriate for adults, considering especially that most of the settings appear to be civilian communities. What really creeped me out are the series of nicknames of other online players that appeared onscreen, some of which were racist and otherwise offensive, and the fact that my son was playing the game with one of his classmates with the name of one of my first cousins who’d died in a car accident a few years ago.

I was petrified for my son and told him that he could not keep that particular game. I took it back and traded it in for a fairly recent WWE game. Though wrestling is violent to a certain extent, it is better than gun violence, and there is little to no bloodshed on any of these types of games. Shortly after I returned the game, which was around Christmas of last year, my brother purchased and gave my son a “Call of Duty Ghosts” game. Though certain scenes in the game are not as violent as “Black Ops,” for the most part it is just as violent… Unfortunately, there was no receipt for a return or exchange or proof that we in particular had purchased it, noting that it is proper to check in with a parent before buying especially violent games for children that their parents might not approve of.

Earlier that year or perhaps the year before, I went to get my nephew who was being combative with his parents at the time. He’d brought and commenced playing a disturbing video game, Grand Theft Auto or a similar game, if my memory serves me correctly. When I saw the violence in the game I asked him to turn it off; and he promptly ignored me…

I put a little authority in my voice and the electricity went out. I think that might have frightened him a bit, and when the electricity came back on he didn’t touch the game. I explained to the children that what we feed our minds eventually manifests in our actions, and these types of games had apparently played a part in influencing my nephew in an improper way…

Though my son still has the “Call of Duty Ghosts” game, and his friends have their own version of the “Black Ops” game that I returned, I made it clear that that was the last game of the sort that he would ever get while he is a minor residing with me…

The Call of Duty Games made me further think of the fact that my son is a young man who in a few years could possibly be drafted into the military, which is not something that either of us wants, and we’ll take appropriate actions to prevent this, though Justice’s dad served in the navy for more than a dozen years…

The game made me think of real military black ops that have been corrupt in nature and exposed in documentaries. Many of these initiatives have served no intelligible purpose and have been a squander of tax payer dollars that could and should be spent only on merited initiatives. The Call of Duty games and other circumstances have made me wonder if children are being recruited for real military black ops, which would be inappropriate, especially without a parent’s permission, and if the military and/or others under their influence is persuading children to disobey merited orders of their parents.

These games have made me critically think of what the military should and should not be. The military, like all law enforcement agencies, should be a force that is exemplary for us all, one that is superior to and yet respectful of the common folk and takes appropriate measures to detain those who break the law with the least possible violence and casualties…

I have persistently stressed the need for a formal international government that would consist of a mega militia that would be comprised of troops from every pointer of the globe; this would further decrease casualties among troops from any given nation. This would save the United States and other nations billions of dollars while creating a magnanimous presence of global law enforcement that would have the respect of all nations. The military that I have in mind would primarily build rather than destroy and would make use of the very best of technology during ventures to apprehend culprits. Its focus would be enforcing laws and sanctions issued by the International Court of Justice or World Court, which should be the supreme authority of the globe.

The World Court should, in every instance of occurrence, issue legal sanctions against those, whether national or state leaders or common folk, who commit war crimes; and the (world) military should focus on strategically capturing/detaining and delivering those leaders and any and all accomplices for legal interrogation and prosecution, following due process of law. In other words, when a nation attacks another nation or commits crimes against its own citizens, the very first thing that should occur is (1) a ready and thorough investigation by appointees from what should be a world government. When the source of the attack is identified, whether an individual leader or several individuals, the military should (2) act as a marshall that delivers service of process/subpoenas and/or that honors arrest warrants for those individual culprits and accomplices, who’ll likely in many cases turn themselves over to the authorities. If they do not turn themselves over or obey other judicial orders (i.e. cease and desist, etc.) the World Court/government should (3) impeach/dis-empower the individuals, and (4) appoint new leaders to those territories.

Local militias of nations who have had their leaders lawfully removed for war crimes should be informed that they are to follow orders from the newly appointed leaders, who would be held responsible for restoring and maintaining order in those territories. The local militias would further be informed via correspondence and the media that refusing to follow the orders of the newly appointed leaders and the World Court would result in issuance of sanctions for non-compliance.

Again, the military of the world government, which would be a superb strategic planning unit, should/would seek to prevent, intervene upon, and stop wars with few as possible fatalities.

Ethics in Black Ops and Military Psychological Operations

Military operations of any kind should be ethical in nature, including all black ops and military psychological operations, which should never consist of such methods as gaslighting individuals who are subjects of formal or informal investigations, which should always be merited.

There is no merit in the military stalking and harassing individuals or recruiting other law enforcement agencies and/or common citizens to do so because the subject(s) own something that is coveted by military officials or other relevant authorities, or because of the subject’s political views, and/or because the subject(s) have participated in protected conduct, like filing an internal complaint at their job, or with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), or any of the courts. Military and other law enforcement officials and/or their superiors who appoint them to gaslight innocent persons should be evaluated for mental illness and alleviated of duty to preserve public safety if proper interventions or disciplinary actions would not correct or improve their behavior.

In Summation and Conclusion

The notion of the military instilling discipline into its members, like getting up early, exercising, and being responsible, is certainly honorable. The military should be a civilized agency, however. Each and every day, it should build rather than destroy.

It should police and apprehend culprits with the least possible casualties rather than fight them, and it should certainly not endorse and/or carry out “black ops” that serve no intelligible purpose…

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